Videos

Wissen im Herzen
Luftverschmutzung - unser tägliches Passivrauchen

deutsch, 5:13 min, 2017

Meinrat Andreae:
What is the Impact of Aerosol Particles on Cloud Formation?
english, 10:44 min, 2017

Wissen im Herzen
11 Fakten über Allergien
deutsch, 2:15, 2016

 

 

Pressebilder

At the beginning of 2012 the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry moved into a new building. Picture: A. Reuter
The new MPI for Chemistry building
Berlin 1912: The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute was the predecessor institute of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. After the building‘s destruction during the Second World war the scientists continued their work in Tailfingen  (today Albstadt) and later on  moved to Mainz. In 1949, the institute became part of the Max Planck Society. Consequently it‘s name changed into Max Planck Institute for Chemistry.  Source: Archive of the Max Planck Society Berlin-Dahlem
1912: The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Berlin
Research at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz is focused on the Earth System. The scientists explore the chemical processes in the atmosphere as well as the interactions between ocean, atmosphere, soil, biosphere and humans while working in the laboratory or in field experiments.  Picture: Carsten Costard
The new MPI for Chemistry building
Paul J. Crutzen was head of the Atmospheric Chemistry Department at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry from 1980 to 2000. In 1995 Paul Crutzen was awarded the Nobel Prize together with his colleagues Mario Molina and Sherwood Rowland. They succeeded in explaining the damaging effect  of fluorochlorinated hydrocarbons in combination with ice particles in polar stratospheric clouds on the ozone layer. Source: Archive of the Max Planck Society Berlin-Dahlem
Paul Crutzen
Forschung live erleben: Am Tag der offenen Tür 2012 hatten die Besucher die Gelegenheit, in die Welt der Wissenschaft hinein zu schnuppern´, wie hier beispielsweise in der „Riechbar“. Foto Rosita Eckl
Forschung live erleben
In an open-air laboratory in the Amazon Rain Forest employees of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry investigate which molecules are emitted by plants. Thus, they want to learn more about the natural cycles. Picture: Meinrat O. Andreae
Open-air laboratory in the Amazon Rain Forest
Messstation auf dem Kleinen Feldberg nördlich von Frankfurt. Foto: Carsten Costard
Messstation auf dem Kleinen Feldberg
For characterizing chemical compounds scientists at the Max Planck Institute for chemistry very often use mass spectrometers. Picture: Axel Giersch
Use of mass spectrometers
A stalagmite sample is prepared for the mass spectrometer measurement of trace elements. Picture: David Ausserhofer
Mass spectrometer measurement of trace elements
Data evaluation by computer: In addition in collecting samples during field measurement campaigns the researcher’s daily work also includes precise analysis and interpretation of the data. Picture: David Ausserhofer
Data evaluation by computer
On the surfaces of ice clouds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere trace substances are absorbed or react chemically. Such heterogeneous chemical processes play an important role in the atmosphere. For a deeper understanding of such processes researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry develop different experimental setups in their laboratories. The picture shows a part of an experiment in which the gaseous reactants are diluted and afterwards added to an ice layer. Picture: David Ausserhofer
Experimental setups in their laboratories of the Atmospheric Chemistry
Sample tubes in the laboratory. Picture: David Ausserhofer
Sample tubes
Research first hand: On the Day of the Open House in 2012 the visitors had the chance to experience the world of science on their own. Picture: R. Eckl
Research first hand